Tuesday , January 19 2021

How Monet's best works affect our brain



The world is famous for its visionary depiction of the French Impressionist Claude Monet's paintings nature.

A new study has found that in Monet's art, there can be something in which the science of flexible properties and something in which our brain interprets color.

The Rochester Center for Visual Science University has studied many paintings from Monet's Waterloo Bridge series, which is located in Rochester, NY-based Memorial Art Gallery, Moneto Waterloo Bridge: Vision and Processes' # 39; Created a demonstration with title.

& # 39; With every painting of this series, Monet behaves in terms of viewers that scientists at that time did not fully understand, & # 39; University explained.

This study explains the 'complexity of the visual system, publishes the problems of monetization processes and its functions', explaining it.

Monet series Waterloo Bridge looks around its surroundings and surroundings, including swirling fog, soft light and dust.

Researchers have noted that each painting uses a very limited color palette, however, it looks as unique anyway.

The answer to why the work of each art looks different may be in the list of how the answer to the wavelength of light is in the light.

There are three different types of cone in Retina, which consists of blue, which grow on a short wavelength of light, green that is sensitive to moderate wavelength light and red, which are sensitive to long wavelengths of light. For the University of Rochester.

Overall, these signals help explain why we see so many different colors of color.

Once our retina processes this information, then it travels to the cerebral cortex of the brain, which is then called & # 39; high-level parts of the brain & # 39; Transferring on, such a dealer with memory and experience, noted Rochester University

3D scenes on the Monnet 2D surface are advancing through painting.

According to the researchers, the effect of this visual process is similar to our eyes.

A 3D world is reversed to a flat retina, then our brain turns to the image to the right to understand the image.

A & # 39; Illusion & # 39; Monet & # 39; Tricks & # 39; showing elements of light, shadow, and contrast to paint. The viewer's brain, the University said.

& # 39; You know it's an illusion but your brain automatically groups things and tells you that it's a three-dimensional scene, & # 39; Explains Professor DuJ Tedin of Brain and Cognitive Science.

& # 39; … the goal of our vision is not to give us an accurate picture of the surrounding environment, but to give us the most useful picture.

& # 39; and most useful and most accurate are not always the same. & # 39;

Monet also has a little more & # 39; trick & # 39; brain in our brain. To operate the lights in his work

While the Waterloo Bridge never changes the color of its paintings, it seems as a result of Monet using different colors and intensities.

These models show sunshine, direct sunlight and dusk appearance, e.g. The blue color looks like direct sunlight, while the red color looks like the sun's alignment.

Robert Williams, Professor of Optics at Rochester University, explained how & # 39; it's different on how Monet's work is different, depending on how it is published. & # 39;

However, anyone with a common color view in this category will know that: The bridge is gray brick, it is not a day's time, because the brain has developed shiny tactics, which estimates the true possessions of objects despite the light of rich diversity. Generally, the situation we are experiencing & # 39;

Additionally, the monet uses different colored brushstruks next to each other and does not mix it, as a result it is called paradoxically.

Contrary to the contrary, when the same color is separated with a different color, it looks different.

As a result, former postdoctoral researcher Van J Park in Brashstrox Tadin's Lab, who stimulates our eyes, acts as a light rash, said in a statement.

Park states that 'viewers can use their own reconstructive processes in the brain so that patches can be integrated into compatible items.' & # 39;

What do they find?

In the Waterloo Bridge, Claude Monet described the surrounding landscape and the surroundings of the bridge, including the Swirling fog, the soft light and the smog.

Researchers have noted that each painting uses a very limited color palette, however, it looks as unique anyway.

They discovered that they have bothered in a manner in which our eyes and our brain will explain the light and the shape.

A & # 39; Illusion & # 39; Monet & # 39; Tricks & # 39; showing elements of light, shadow, and contrast to paint. The viewer's brain, the University said.

What else, it uses contrasting brush strokes to understand how our brain understands every color.

Published in the Daily Times, January 7M 2019


Source link