Friday , January 22 2021

They find genes that affect the size of the head and brain



21 January, 2019, 16:28London, January 21 (Perence Latina) Through a comprehensive Gnome Association study of older children and adults, an international team of scientists has found that the circumference of our final head was predicted to be genetically predicted at a very early age.

Experts from the Max Planck Institute of Psycholinglicics in Germany, and Bristol University of the United Kingdom, have analyzed 46,000 adults and children, through which they investigate the general and relatively rare genetic variations.

This analysis included many aides, including the Parents and Children's Evangelical Studies, a possible sample where scientists can monitor the development of children from birth.

Experts have observed that genetic performance on the circumference of the head is collectively stagnant during development and is associated with genetic factors which contribute to intracranial volumes.

We were surprised that genetic factors in childhood are more than 70 percent of genetic variations over seven years and more than 60 percent of people over the age of 15 years, according to the study's first author Chian Yang.

Considering the head circumference and intracranial volume, the team recognizes nine new locks (fixed position on the chromosome), as two steps of a shared distribution within the so-called final chronicle dimension of the authors.

The above TP53 gene contains very effective genetic genetic variation that occurs only in about two percent of the population.

Experts explain that TP53 encodes protein P53, which regulates cell division and death, so it can be important for the development of meninges, thick membranes covering the brain and under the direct skull.

Our findings show that Gnome-W approaches that attach to genetically related and developing phonotypes, enhances the power to identify relatively rare genetic diversity with great effect, summarizing Simon Howarth, who is associated with Bristol University. MV / LRC


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