Friday , January 22 2021

Quadrant Meteor Shower Peaks Thursday: How to Watch the First Big Fountain of the Year





The first meteor shower in 2019 will light up the night sky, quadrantied shower, Thursday and Friday night.

Here's what you need to know about the first spatial look of the year:

What is the name?

According to EarthSky.org, Quadrantine has been named for a constellation that no longer exists. This name actually comes from the Star Quadrans Muirulis or Mural Quadrant, which was located between the constellation, which boots Harmsman and Draco Drone in the constellation near the end of the "Big Dipper" handle.

Why Meteor Shower?

According to NASA, the meteorite particles originated from asteroid 2003 EH1, which is now an extinct or "rock comet" which once took 5.52 years to the Sun's orbit. It was first discovered in 2003.

NASA's weather expert Bill Cooke told Space.com, "It was either a piece of smoke or a comet, and then it was extinct," the site says evaporating the smoke and other volatiles of the comet.

Experts believe that Asteroids have several connections with Comet 96 P / Marchholte, which travels the Sun every six years.

How many meters will I see?

During the narrow shifts of the shower, you can be able to see up to 60 to 200 "Bright Fireball Meteors" per hour in perfect conditions. But it's likely that you will lose lots of great weather.

According to NASA, "Balloons are a big explosion of light and color that can last longer than average meteorites." "The fact that fireballs originate from large particles of content."

When will it peak?

According to the International Meteor Organization, fountain 2 AM UTC (9 pm GMT East) climbs to Skypeers are likely to get the best opinion in Europe, but viewers of North America can catch a few quadrants in the top ramp, "Cook told Space.com.

Where do I need to go to see Meteor Shower?

Meteor shower will be seen from the northern hemisphere, and will look the best from mid-northern and far-northern latitudes. NASA experts recommend that one area is well-exposed to city or street lights for optimum darkness.

Meteor shower will be seen from the northern hemisphere, and will look the best from mid-northern and far-northern latitudes. NASA experts recommend that one area is well-exposed to city or street lights for optimum darkness. (Photo File by Pixabay.com)

Do I Need a Telescope?

According to Space.com, telescopes and telescopes will not help. The reason for this is that those tools are designed to expand and focus on standing objects in the sky.

The naked eye will do exactly.

How to safely see the shower

Some NASA Advice: "Be ready with a sleeping bag, blanket or lawn chair for the winter season. Flat your back with your feet in the northeast direction and watch the sky as much as possible. In less than 30 minutes in the dark, your eyes will adapt and you will see a meteorite. Be patient. Be patient-show will run for a patch, so you have a lot of time to catch a glimpse. "


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