Thursday , October 21 2021

Hubble's first picture after returning to the service. Telescope is again again operational with three functioning cows



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Hubble Space Telescope is a hero in the world of astronomy. And on October 5th when he faced bad action, he tried a brave man to work again as part of the Hubble team. Now after returning to the service we have the first picture of Hubble.

After its difficulties, Hubble's first picture is not its final, thanks to all the dedicated people who manage all of Georos and Space telescopes. Have Hubble, or six Gheroscopes. Telescope is designed to work with three genors, while the other three serve as backups. This was to be thought out, because the geoscopes all eventually fail.

Two failed before – in March 2014 and second in April-2012 – they left four. But on the 5th night, failure left it with only 3 operational garrows, and no backups. When the wires failed, Hubble put himself in a safe position. It stops doing science and draws attention to its sun panels on the sun, and the instructions await.

"This is a unreliable saga, built on the brave efforts of the Hubble team," – Hubble senior project scientist Jennifer Wissman at NASA Goddard.

Gheroscope failed at the end of the three-day weekend, and Hubble team members started coming out of text messages what had happened. Since 2011, Hubble Control Center has been automated, so when team members gathered there, it was like the old time.

Hubble's picture is part of the Six Garros Space Telescope Pointing Control System, which includes Reaction Wheels and Fine Guidance Sensors. All of these components work together to make Hubble work. Image: NASA
Hubble's picture is part of the Six Garros Space Telescope Pointing Control System, which includes Reaction Wheels and Fine Guidance Sensors. All of these components work together to make Hubble work. Image: NASA

More than a dozen members gathered in the control room of the Goddard Space Flight Center. They tried to turn back the failed cows, but failed. Then they activated back-up garrors, but they report a super-rotation rate of 450 degrees per hour. This is changing with just one hour less than one hour with Hubble.

Dave Haskins is Hubble's Mission Operations Manager at Goddard, and according to him never before. Haskins said, "This is something we have never seen before any other garrose – this high rate."

This failure was the final backup for Hubble. Hubble can work only with one georeo, but its capabilities seriously reduce. This "one-garrows" mode was previously designed and tested, but it was their only, ultimate choice, until the Hubble team wanted to use it. One-Garrance mode will work, but it will limit the efficiency of Hubble, and at some time of the year the telescope can be seen in the sky. If that had happened, then everyone in the astronomical community would know that the end is closer to the respected Hubble.

Team members wondered what to do next, and for the first time in many years, people were continually monitoring the health of Hubble in the control room.

"It shows team diversity." – Dave Haskins, Hubble Mission Operations Manager.

Haskin shared that, "The team is stretched together around the clock, and there is something we have not done for years." Team members took action to take shift – engineers from some Hubble systems, others who helped run Hubble's ground systems tests and checkouts, and some people who used Hubble's control room but were not for a long time. Haskins said, "For years it has been coming to the console and it works like a shift." "For me it was seamless. It shows the versatility of the team."

This is not the first time when Hubble had a problem with its pointing system. In this image, astronauts are taking place in place of Hubble reaction wheels in March 2002. Image credit: NASA
This is not the first time when Hubble had a problem with its pointing system. In this image, astronauts are taking place in place of Hubble reaction wheels in March 2002. Image credit: NASA

Hubble manager Pat Cross has been busy in the late week of recruiting a team of experts to analyze the abnormal behavior of over-speed gear and what can be done. The group was found on Tuesday 9 October for the first time and contributed to its insights in Hubble's recovery. Weeks after thinking of their way through problem and test solutions, the Cruise Group and the Hubble team suspected that some physically interfere with the wires might physically interfere. But whatever the issue, they have to solve from the ground. There will be no more mission to fix Hubble.

"At the beginning we did not realize that we would be able to resolve that issue." Mike Myslinsky, deputy mission operations manager of Hubble.

The team decided that if they were one, they would try to overcome the obstacle. They repeatedly turned the wires through various performance modes. They turned the telescop into a large amount. Eventually, abusive gear started to decrease in higher circulation rates and eventually came closer to normal.

The result was encouraged by the team, but they were still cautious. If a Gioros has reported extremely high rates of spin, Hubble will go back to the safe position, which hinders the science that is doing it. The hospital then again uploads to Hubble for new security against Hubble. They put a space telescope through some practice maneuvers to follow realistic study observations. Hubble did a good job, and the team gave way to relief.

Hubble's Deputy Mission Operations Manager, Mike Mylinsky, said about the rates of High Garrers: "We have not initially realized that we are able to resolve that issue."

The other team was working hard on the work in the background, preparing for the event to be ignored so far. They were just preparing to work for a hub for Hubble, while another one was reserved as a back-up. This situation can be avoided at this time, but it will eventually happen. "We know we'll have to go one day in one joro, and we want to be as good as possible for him," Myslinsky explained. "We always said that once we reached three jiars, we should proceed as much as possible for one science. That day is coming."

However, for the hull, Hubble is cruising as something happened. The image of his first science is in the constellation of the entire relation of Pygassa. This image has 11 billion light-years of star formation galaxies. There is no problem for Hubble.

After returning to service, Hubble's first image is in the field of galaxy in the constellation Pegasus. Image credit: NASA, ISA, and A. Shapley (UCLA)
After returning to service, Hubble's first image is in the field of galaxy in the constellation Pegasus. Image credit: NASA, ISA, and A. Shapley (UCLA)

"This is a wonderful piece built on the Hubble team's brave efforts," says Jennifer Wiseman, senior professor of Hubble at NASA Goddard, Hubble. "Thank you for this work, the Hubble Space Telescope is a full science capability that will benefit the astronomical community and the public for years to come."

With its many years of operation, Hubble has become like a family member for scientists and our rest. We know that one day, its mission will end, and that will happen. It will be a sad day. But for now, Hubble still does science and we catch some beautiful images from the universe we live in.

Enjoy it when it's there!

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